Launceston hospital land: the restrictive covenant not mentioned by the auctioneers

17th October 2017 By Peter Tremayne The low price sought by NHS Property Services for the sale of land next to Launceston hospital might be explained by a restrictive...

All eyes now on Cornwall’s care providers, as councillors say “yes” to doing more with £39 million less

17th October 2017 By Graham Smith Cornwall councillors have given the green light to plans which they say will “transform social care” by changing dramatically the way elderly and...

Devonwall returns, as a theoretical prospect, but the Parliamentary maths remain unchanged – for now

17th October 2017 By Rashleigh MacFarlane The prospect of a “Devonwall” Parliamentary constituency has returned to the political agenda, as the Boundary Commission continues its quest to re-draw boundaries...

Launceston hospital land about to go under the hammer

16th October 2017 By Anne North A patch of land next to Launceston hospital is due to go for sale at auction later this month. NHS Property Services Ltd...

Is it really possible to cut £39 million from the budget and still give the workers a pay rise? Cornwall contemplates a social care revolution

16th October 2017 By Graham Smith Trade unions representing care workers have given a cautious welcome to radical new proposals for merging Cornwall Council’s and NHS social care services....

EXCLUSIVE: Cornwall Council’s new vision of adult social care – cut the workers’ pay to save £39 million

14th October 2017 By Graham Smith Cornwall Council chiefs have set out their vision of adult social care for the future – aiming to cut £39 million over four...

Cornwall summit warned that Brexit risks becoming a “complete mess”

13th October 2017 By Graham Smith South West Euro MP Clare Moody has been visiting Cornwall College, at St Austell, in a bid to explain the implications of Britain's...

Cornwall’s children’s services head for the door, as the complexities of integrating council with health start to hit home

13th October 2017 By Rashleigh MacFarlane Cornwall’s children’s services could undergo a radical restructure if councillors approve plans drawn up by senior officers. The department, which as well as...

Cornwall’s MPs lost for words about Falmouth University chief’s £300,000 pay and pension deal

11th October 2017 By Peter Tremayne All but one of Cornwall’s MPs appear too busy to comment on news that the Vice Chancellor of Falmouth University is on a...

A Very Bodmin Scandal, as former MP Peter Bessell returns in TV version of the Jeremy Thorpe story

11th October 2017 By Graham Smith Production is now underway for a three-part television drama telling the story of former Liberal Party leader Jeremy Thorpe.  The series also tells...


Nearly 8,000 Cornwall voters removed from electoral register ahead of Brexit referendum

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Nearly 8,000 Cornish voters could have missed out on June's Brexit referendum because of a change in the way the electoral register is compiled.

Election officials at Cornwall Council have disclosed in response to a request under the Freedom of Information Act that 7,783 voters were struck off because of the switch to Individual Electoral Registration (IER) between June 2014 and December 2015.

The new system replaced that in which the "head of the household" was required to register all residents of the household who were eligible

surf-tax

Cornwall’s “surf tax” raised only £32,000

The controversial "surf tax" scheme introduced to several Cornish beaches has raised barely £32,000 in revenue after its first year – raising questions as to whether it cost more than that to introduce and enforce.

Cornwall Council spent more than two years investigating ways of using its natural assets to generate income before introducing "licensing for water-based activities on council-owned beaches" in September last year. Similar licensing arrangements are operated by other councils.

But now North Cornwall MP Scott Mann has criticised the council's answer to a formal Freedom of Information question, which gives details of how the scheme – dubbed a "surf tax" by its critics – is operating in practice.

The FOI answer reveals that since the scheme's inception, Cornwall Council has generated just £31,746 from 18 licenses. The council insists that the costs of collection and enforcement are negligible and that the "surf tax" is good value for money – but Mr Mann says it should be scrapped.